Friday 19 December

Reveal among us the light of your presence, that we may behold your power and glory.

Antiphon
O Radix Jesse

O Root of Jesse, standing as a sign among the peoples
before you kings will shute their mouths
to you the nations will make their prayer:
Come and deliver us, and delay no longer.
(cf. Isaiah 11.10, 45.14, 52.15; Romans 15.12)

Readings (Click the links to see the readings)

Isaiah 7.10-14 | Psalm 24.1-6 | Luke 1.28-38 |

A poem for Christmas
From Nativity Poems by Joseph Brodsky
(translated from Russian by Seamus Heaney).

Imagine striking a match that night in the cave:
use the cracks in the floor to feel the cold.
Use crockery in order to feel the hunger.
And to feel the desert—but the desert is everywhere.
Imagine striking a match in that midnight cave,
the fire, the farm beasts in outline, the farm tools and stuff;
and imagine, as you towel your face in the towel's folds,
the bundled up Infant. And Mary and Joseph.
Imagine the kings, the caravans' stilted procession
as they make for the cave, or rather three beams closing in
and in on the star; the creaking of loads, the clink of a cowbell;
(but in the cerulean thickening over the Infant
no bell and no echo of bell: He hasn't earned it yet.)
Imagine the Lord, for the first time, from darkness, and stranded
immensely in distance, recognising Himself in the Son,
of Man: homeless, going out to Himself in a homeless one.

Prayer

Eternal God,
as Mary waited for the birth of your Son,
so we wait for his coming in glory;
bring us through the birth pangs of this present age
to see, with her, our great salvation
in Jesus Christ our Lord.

Woodcut Woodcut
Woodcut Woodcut
Woodblock prints from Te Bethlehem onder de Ster [In Bethlehem under the Star], by Ruth Schaumann. (Munich: Kösel & Pustet, M√ľnchen, 1933).

Harold Darke. In the bleak mid-winter, words by Christian Rosetti,
Gloucester Cathedral Choir and congregation.


May the Lord, when he comes, find us watching and waiting. Amen.